Birds We Raise

Birds We Raise

While quail is what we are known for, we have branched out into other species of game birds and specialty poultry to offer a variety of freshly prepared meats, offal, stock bones, and more. All of our birds are certified organic by NOFA-NY and raised on pasture. The cost of our meat and eggs directly reflects the quality of care, feed, and living conditions we upkeep daily. We are not subsidized by the government in any way like many of the large meat farms in our country. Find below brief descriptions of our fine-feathered fowl!

** WE DO NOT SELL LIVE BIRDS, CHICKS, OR HATCHING EGGS**

 Two Coturnix hens check out their nest box.

Two Coturnix hens check out their nest box.

Coturnix aka japanese quail

This species of quail originated in east Asia and also goes by the name "Old World Quail" and sometimes "Nile Quail." The earliest written record of their domestication is in 12th century Japan and they were originally kept for their unique song. More recently bred for meat and egg production, these quail can lay up to 300 eggs in a year. When processed for meat, they average between 6 - 8 ounces. The entire bird consists of richly flavored dark meat. They reach market weight in 8 - 10 weeks. AVAILABILITY: May through December

 Silkie chickens enjoying pasture life.

Silkie chickens enjoying pasture life.

Silkie chicken

While these birds are not a game bird, we raise these unusual chickens for their prized gray-black skin, meat, and bones. They are also known as "polydactyls" which means that they have five toes rather than four. Most often recognized in asian cuisines, silkie chickens have gained a following here in America as their meat and bones are essential ingredients in soups, stews, curries, and bone broth. When processed for meat, average weight is between 1.5 - 2 pounds. They take 12 - 14 weeks to reach market weight. AVAILABILITY: May through December

 A flock of French Guinea Fowl clipping down a stand of mugwort.

A flock of French Guinea Fowl clipping down a stand of mugwort.

French guinea fowl

Guinea Fowl have roots in West Africa. Breeding pairs were brought to Europe and the Americas by the Portuguese in the late 16th century. These birds won't be winning any awards with their personality or conversational skills, but they do a fine job hunting for bugs and mowing down pasture. Because these birds are heavy foragers, the flavor of their meat often changes with the seasons and develops more fat in the late summer & fall months. Their meat is lean and tender. When processed for meat, they average between 3 - 3.5 pounds. They reach market weight in 12 - 14 weeks. AVAILABILITY: May through December

 Chukar Parade! Photo Courtesy of  Go North Fork

Chukar Parade! Photo Courtesy of Go North Fork

chukar partridge

The chukar partridge is the national bird of Pakistan as well as Iraq, but it has been widely introduced as a game bird all across the world. These rotund birds are incredible fliers and can be pugnacious during breeding season, which consists only of the summer months. Often called the "gateway" game bird because of its white breast meat reminiscent in flavor and texture to chicken, its a great treat for anyone new to eating game birds. When processed for meat, average weight is around 1 pound. They take a full 16 weeks to reach market weight. AVAILABILITY: October and November ONLY

 Profile of one of our Bourbon Red turkeys. Photo Courtesy of  Go North Fork

Profile of one of our Bourbon Red turkeys. Photo Courtesy of Go North Fork

Heritage Breed turkey

Heritage turkeys are defined (as per The Livestock Conservancy) by the historic, range-based production system in which they are raised. Turkeys must meet all of the following criteria to qualify as a Heritage turkey:

1. Naturally mating: the Heritage Turkey must be reproduced and genetically maintained through natural mating, with expected fertility rates of 70-80%. This means that turkeys marketed as “heritage” must be the result of naturally mating pairs of both grandparent and parent stock. Their industrial counterparts, the broad breasted bronze and the broad breasted white, cannot do this and therefore not considered "heritage" breeds. 

2. Long productive outdoor lifespan: the Heritage Turkey must have a long productive lifespan. Breeding hens are commonly productive for 5-7 years and breeding toms for 3-5 years. The Heritage Turkey must also have a genetic ability to withstand the environmental rigors of outdoor production systems.

3. Slow growth rate: the Heritage Turkey must have a slow to moderate rate of growth. Today’s heritage turkeys reach a marketable weight in about 28 weeks, giving the birds time to develop a strong skeletal structure and healthy organs prior to building muscle mass.

For the 2018 season we will be raising Black Spanish and Royal Palm.  AVAILABILITY: Thanksgiving ONLY